News Update: June 2015

Posted by Dave Vizard on

BEHAVIOUR SOLUTIONS NEWSLETTER – JUNE 2015

Hope that the Summer Term is going well and that examinations, assessments and report writing is nearly complete. Below are a number of items highlighting latest research and news from educational world.

EXAM STRESS

According to the NSPCC there has been a 200% increase in the number of young people seeking counselling over exam stress. In 2013 ChildLine received more than 34000 approaches from young people over school worries relating to revision and school workloads and the NSPCC reported for the same period there were more than 87,500 visits to ChildLine’s website about exam stress.

AVOID REVISING ALL NIGHT

The Harvard Graduate School of Education examined the characteristics and performance of 4,000 British pupils aged 11- 18. It found that staying up all night revising may not be a good idea. They found that pupils showing emotional resilience and ‘grit’ are less likely to deprive themselves of sleep and food than less resilient peers. A better measure of determination was how well pupils managed their time.

CLASSICAL MUSIC GIVES YOUR BRAIN A BOOST

Research conducted by Sapienza University in Rome found that people who listened to Mozart experienced an increase in brain activity linked to memory, understanding and problem solving. Interestingly no such differences were seen after a group listened to Beethoven’s music. They found that Mozart’s music is able to activate neuronal cortical circuits relating to attentive and cognitive functions.

HOSPITAL ADMISSIONS FOR TEENAGERS WITH ANXIETY HAS RISEN BY 50% IN PAST 4 YEARS

This increase was indicated by The Priory Group, the country’s largest organisation for mental health hospitals and clinics. In 2014, 262 boys and girls aged 12- 17 were admitted to one of its centres with severe depression and anxiety which is an increase from 178 in 2010.The Office for National Statistics indicated that 20% of teenagers and young adults suffered some degree of anxiety last year, a higher proportion than in other generations. Psychiatrists blame sexting and online bullying on websites for increased pressures on young people.

CHILDREN STAYING INDOORS DAMAGES THEIR EYESIGHT

Rates of short-sightedness are increasing in young people according to several pieces of research. The lack of natural daylight and sitting in front of television and computer screens has contributed to the increase. In China 80% of teenagers are short-sighted and Chinese Scientists have reported a 23% reduction in myopia in children who spend an extra 40 minutes a day in the sunshine.

I hope that you have a successful end of term and that you manage to have a relaxing Summer break.
Best wishes
Dave